Look!

Photograph by Chip Willis

Lamplight

Photograph by Chip Willis

The End

This is the end, beautiful friend
This is the end, my only friend, the end
(The Doors)
Photograph by Chip Willis
Carmenica’s Bonus

Smoking

Photograph by Chip Willis

Nonchalant Pose

Photograph by Chip Willis

Herbert Ascherman

Herbert Ascherman

Rose.

Ascherman favors platinum printing, the 140-year-old process by which a negative of the image is placed on platinum-coated paper and exposed to ultraviolet light.

Patented in 1873 by the Englishman William Willis, Platinum printing was immediately embraced at the turn of the century by photographers of the Pictorialist and Photo-Secession movements. Prized by the masters, this entirely hand made process exceeds all others in its physical beauty and longevity.

An image made in Platinum, or its sister metal Palladium, will vary in color and intensity from warm dark browns to cold neutral blacks depending on the proportions of the metals used. Printing the image is a contact process, requiring a negative the exact size of the print to be made. The photographer hand coats the paper with a solution of  Platinum, places the negative directly on the dried coated paper, and exposes the image to ultra violet light (which, in the old days meant placing the image outside in the sun for exposure). The image is then developed, fixed, washed and dried. (Source)

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Chip Willis

Chip Willis.

“People describe what my work is and I have a difficult time attaching a name to it. I shoot what I see. Hopefully there is some story in there. It isn’t about pretty, boobs, or other body parts. They are common in the work, but deeper to that, there is a person, and a blend of our personalities in the work itself, at least I hope so.” (Source)

Chip Willis

Chip Willis.

The Real Chip Willis

Chip Willis

Chip Willis.